Despite the High Cost of a Breach, Security Not a Top Priority Among Half of Asia Pacific Companies

A new generation of unknown security threats stemming from megatrends and technologies like BYOD, mobility, cloud computing, and Internet usage, as well as internal actions both accidental and malicious, introduce organisations to a multitude of new risks.

 

According to a Dell global security poll, surveyed organisations in India, Australia and China who suffered a security breach in the last 12 months estimate that each breach cost the organisation an average of US$616,000.

 

Eighty-one percent of IT leaders surveyed agree that to combat against today’s cyber-criminals, an organisation must protect itself both inside and outside of its perimeters. This requires a comprehensive set of solutions that protects from the endpoint to the cloud, and also connects these capabilities to provide deeper insights and stronger predictive analytics to that strategic action can be taken.

 

Addressing user behavior is also a top priority. A majority (77%) of the respondents say they have increased funds spent on education and training of employees in the past 12 months; while 50% believe security training for both new and current employees is a priority indicating a clear and decisive move toward addressing user behavior as a relevant unseen threat.

 

Survey respondents in India were top believers in addressing user behaviour with 85% having increased funds spent on education and training of employees in the past 12 months and 53% of those surveyed believing that security training for both new and current employees is a priority.

 

Sixty percent of survey respondents in Australia say they have increased funds spent on education and training of employees in the past 12 months; 57% believe security training for both new and current employees is a priority.

 

Meanwhile, 72% of survey respondents in China say they have increased funds spent on education and training of employees in the past 12 months; 40% believe security training for both new and current employees is a priority.

 

Despite the cost of a breach and the investments needed in securing the business, only 51% of IT decision-makers shared that security will be their top priority in the next 12 months. Fifty-eight percent of IT decision-makers surveyed in India and 49% of IT decision-makers in China agree that security will be their top priority in the next 12 months.

 

However, only 30% of IT decision-makers surveyed in Australia are putting security as their top priority. This is similar to the global average of 38%.

 

A majority of 88% of those surveyed in the three countries believe that their current security processes enable IT to immediately identify a security breach; yet actual detection took 8 hours on average – pointing to a difference between IT leaders’ expectations of their security situation and the reality.

 

This is comparable to the global results, where 83% report their current security processes enable IT to immediately identify a security breach, yet actual detection took 7 hours on average.

 

Australia fared the worst globally, with 92% reporting that their current security processes enable IT to immediately identify a security breach, yet actual detection took on average 10 hours.

 

In China, 89% report that their current security processes enable IT to immediately identify a security breach, with actual detection taking an average of5 hours.

 

In India, 88% shared that their current security processes enable IT to immediately identify a security breach, with actual detection taking an average of 8 hours.
 

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